Sunday, October 23, 2011

Ice Photos and Other Productions

In our busy lives, it is too easy to forget to include time for creative play. Fortunately, the opportunities sometimes find us, and the results surprise and rejuvenate.

I had the pleasure of participating in a photography workshop put on by photographer Matthew Wheeler in September, titled Breaking the Rules - Letting Chance Happen. 

Wheeler's gallery show The Glacial Lens is the result of years of photography using ice as a filter, one that allows the photographer to follow the ever-changing image as the ice melts. Every image is different and unexpected, as each piece of ice melts in its own idiosyncratic way. Wheeler's results are quite wonderful.

For the workshop, Wheeler set up an array of items for us to experiment with - ice, of course, mirrors, kaleidoscopes, coloured see-through paper (which I'm sure has its own correct term!), cd's as frame,  mirrored balls and disks, and all manner of things to fold, scrunch, and twirl.

We were let loose to wander, invent, and experiment for close to three hours and then present our show for the other participants to see. The results were astonishing and dramatic..

Since switching fully to digital, I have become used to playing around with Photoshop, having fun with post-production. The workshop was all pre-production, and reminded me very much of what I liked about film photography.

Here are some of my favourite images from the over 100 I made:

coloured plastic disks under ice
ceiling/skylight reflection in red see-through paper
ice chunk on gold foil paper
"found" image on concrete post outside - no filters

At the end of the session, I walked outside into the bright sunlight and had quite an intense feeling that I was re-surfacing, re-entering the ordinary world from someplace else where I had been totally and creatively engaged. Note to self : Do this more often!

24 comments:

Pearl said...

ah, very fun. good to spark new ways of photographing and seeing.

Ciss B said...

You have a eye for the artistic! (Through the lens that is!) I think artistically the digital camera is preferable, and in the garden for me when capturing the images of my flowers.

I also have been digital camera, ChrisJ and have had it for a while, but find there are some ways I miss the good old 35 MM.

ChrisJ said...

Pearl,

I was surprised hy the photos and like them.

ChrisJ said...

Christi,

I sometimes miss the old 35mm too, but have given mine away to a good home!

Hels said...

I haven't got a talented bone in my body, with regards to actually _producing_ creative objects. But I can love other peoples' handiwork.

The last picture, called "image on concrete post outside - no filters", could have been Viennese Workshops or Bauhaus easily. If you ever tire of lecturing.... :)

Judie said...

WOW! I am really impressed! You should think about inlarging them and framing! Great work, ChrisJ.

ChrisJ said...

Hels,

Actually, I am tired of lecturing and will probably do more serious photography when I retire in December.

ChrisJ said...

Judie,

I just might! Thanks.

Pearl said...

good to have plans of something to transition to on retiring. does your area have meet up groups of photographers? we've gone to a couple of those around here.

Judie said...

Oh, my! I misspelled enlarging! Shame! Shame!!

Please check out my latest post about the silent auction for breast cancer, ChrisJ. Thanks!!

Owen Gray said...

When I was a kid, I used to deliver newspapers to a guy who worked for the National Film Board.

His specialty was sound; but I can remember a conversation we had about camera work. "They say," he said, "that the camera never lies. Actually, it lies like hell."

What he meant that an angle, a filter, a change in lighting could give an audience a whole new perspective.

It sounds like you've lived that experience, Chris.

ChrisJ said...

Pearl,

Yes, there are one or two. Members of one were at the photo workshop.

ChrisJ said...

Owen,

Cameras do lie, and digital cameras can tell whoppers!

Judie said...

ChrisJ, thanks for the nice comment on my post. I wish I were better with those programs!!

Judie said...

ChrisJ, thanks for the comment on my post. I hope you enjoyed your Canadian Thanksgiving a few weeks ago.

ChrisJ said...

Judie,

Our memories of turkey are long gone, but it was fun. Thanks.

Pearl said...

Hey lady, hope your days are coming along steadily and well.

ChrisJ said...

Hi Pearl,

Thanks for asking. The semester is winding down - great relief! I'm hoping to start posting regularly by the New Year if not before.

Christine

nothingprofound said...

Chris, ever since I discovered the Dadas and John Cage's music I've been intrigued by the influence of Chance operations not only in art, but in life as well. The photos you took during the workshop are perfect examples of the freedom and discovery that can result from this kind of procedure.

Pearl said...

ah good to know. exam marking time takes a lot of neurons.

I hope to get back into regular swing in January. We're moving over the next couple weeks then xmas...

hope you have a good Christmas New Years if we don't speak before then.

ChrisJ said...

NP,

Yes, that's true, and we have to be open to it.

ChrisJ said...

Pearl,

I hope your Christmas and New Year are good - how moving fits into that picture is something I'm glad I don't have to experience!

Judie said...

I have been checking your blog several times a week, waiting for a new post. Have a happy holiday weekend!!

ChrisJ said...

Thanks Judie.